Nimrod International Journal welcomes submissions of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. We publish two issues annually. Our spring issue is thematic, with the theme announced the preceding fall. Previous themes have included Writers of Age; Range of Light: The Americas; Australia; Who We Are; Islands of the Sea and of the Mind; The Arabic Nations; Mexico/USA; and Crossing Borders. The fall issue features the winners and finalists of our annual Literary Awards. In most cases, both issues also contain work accepted as general submissions throughout the year.

Format
Each issue is approximately 200 pages, perfect bound with a four-color cover. 

 

General Submissions

Accepted from January 1st to October 1st each year. Nimrod is closed to general submissions in November and December. Turn-around time for general submissions is one to five months. Online general submissions have a $3 fee associated with them. 

Prose: Work must be previously unpublished. 7,500 words maximum. Double-spaced. We seek vigorous writing with characters that are well developed and dialogue that is realistic without being banal. 

Poetry: Work must be previously unpublished. 3-7 pages. One poem per page. Poetry is open to all styles and subjects. We seek poems that go beyond one word or image, honor the impulse to reveal a truth about, or persuasive version of, the inner and outer worlds. 

We recommend reading a sample issue before submitting a manuscript.

Thematic Submissions

Each fall Nimrod announces a theme for the following spring issue. The guidelines for thematic submissions are the same as for general submissions, except that thematic submissions are sometimes accepted in December. (Very occasionally we may choose a theme from previously accepted manuscripts, and then will not announce one for that year.) Online thematic submissions have a $3 fee associated with them.

For the most up-to-date announcements on themes and other submission information, you can subscribe to our email newsletter or join us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. 


Why is there a $3 fee for online general and thematic submissions?

Our $3 fee is not a reading fee, but a fee to cover the administrative costs associated with our online submission system. We believe that it is similar to what you might spend on a paper submission, once you factor in paper, ink, mailing, return envelopes, and postage. If you do not wish to pay the $3, you may submit via postal mail, as we have no fees associated with postal general and thematic submissions. However, we also offer this alternative as a way to conveniently upload material directly from your computer, as well as to check the status of your submission online.
 

Payment

We pay $10/page, with a maximum payment of $200. Visual artists whose work appears internally will also be compensated at a rate of $10 per image used; front cover artists will be paid $100 for their work. All contributors will also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears. Work selected for publication through our two annual contests, the Nimrod Literary Awards and the Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers, will also receive this payment ($2,000 and $1,000 for the Literary Awards; $500 for the Francine Ringold Awards).

 

Nimrod Literary Awards

Annual contest begins January 1 and ends April 1.

Fiction: 7,500 words maximum (one short story or a self-contained excerpt from a novel)

Poetry: 3-10 pages. One long poem or several shorter poems.

No previously published works or works accepted for publication elsewhere.  Author's name must not appear on the manuscript.  Include a cover sheet with title, author's name, full address, phone & email.

Submissions are open internationally.

All finalists will be considered for publication. In addition to publication and the prize money, winners will also be brought to Tulsa for the Awards Ceremony in October (or, in 2022, will take part in a virtual Awards Ceremony and Reading with our final judges).

 

The Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers

Annual contest begins May 1 and ends July 15. 


Eligibility: The Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers honor the work of writers at the beginning of their careers. They are open only to writers whose work has not appeared or is not scheduled to appear in more than 2 publications. (Self-published works, works with a distribution of less than 100 copies, and journalistic articles are not considered toward the count of 2 publications.)

Prizes: $500 prizes will be awarded in both the fiction and poetry categories, and the winning manuscripts will appear in the spring issue of Nimrod. Winners will have the chance to work with the Nimrod board of editors to refine and edit their manuscripts before publication.

Contest Rules

Fiction: 5,000 words maximum (one short story or a self-contained excerpt from a novel)

Poetry: Up to 5 pages. One long poem or several shorter poems.

No previously published works or works accepted for publication elsewhere.  Author's name must not appear on the manuscript.  Include a cover sheet with title, author's name, full address, phone & email.

The Francine Ringold Awards are open internationally.  


Nimrod 2022 Creative Writing Programming

For over 40 years, Nimrod has hosted an in-person, all-day writing conference in conjunction with the publication of our fall issue. While we will not be hosting this year’s in-person events due to the continuing effects of the pandemic, we’re thrilled to host an extended period of virtual creative writing programming this fall. This year’s programming will feature several months of craft talks, Q&As, readings, and more. We will add more offerings to this schedule as they become available, so keep checking back.

To Register

Please register for all events via our Submittable page. Events range in attendee capacity, so we recommend registering early for our smaller events.

All events will take place via Zoom. Please note that the start times are listed in Central Time.

Events will close to new sign-ups 24 hours before their start times. Please note that all times listed are Central times.

Cost

Craft Talks and Q&As

Craft talks and Q&As have a $5 participation fee, which includes a digital copy of our fall issue, Awards 44. Payment is via the registration form on Submittable.

Readings

All readings are free and open to the public.

While all readings are free of charge, donations are deeply appreciated and help us offer programs like these. We understand that not all writers can afford to make a donation, and we welcome you to attend whether or not you can donate at this time. But the pandemic has been especially hard on non-profit arts organizations like Nimrod, cutting into our normal revenue streams in many ways, and if you can make a donation, it will make a big difference to our journal operations and to our ability to offer programs like these.  Our suggested donation is $5-$10, but we are grateful for donations of all sizes, larger or smaller. Donations can be made via Submittable when registering for the readings.

Free Sessions for Students Enrolled in Tulsa County Schools
We have a limited number of free participation slots available for students currently enrolled in Tulsa County high schools, community colleges/colleges, and vocational schools. To inquire about these free student slots, email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu. Please include your name and the name of your school in your email, along with the name of the session you are interested in attending.

Schedule

For class descriptions, presenter bios, and maximum number of attendees, please view the individual sessions guidelines below.

Saturday, September 24th, 2:00 p.m., Central Time

The Art of Revision — Lisa Horiuchi

Craft Talk 

Thursday, September 29th, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

Ask Us Anything: Editing and Publishing Q&A — Cassidy McCants, Eilis O’Neal

Q&A Session 

Thursday, October 13th, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

[This session is currently full. If you would like to be added to the waitlist, please email nimrod@utulsa.edu with your name and preferred email.]

Beyond “She Said”: Creating and Improving Dialogue in Fiction — Abigale Mazzo

Craft Talk 

Thursday, October 27th, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

Surprise in Fiction — Christopher Murphy

Craft Talk 

Sunday, October 30th, 2:00 p.m., Central Time

The 2022 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction: A Reading with Toni Jensen, Ellen Rhudy, and Treena Thibodeau

Reading and Author Chat 

Saturday, November 5th, 1:00 p.m., Central Time

The 2022 Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry: A Reading with Kaveh Bassiri, Lory Bedikian, and Angela Kirby

Reading and Author Chat

Saturday, November 12th, 2:00 p.m., Central Time

Collaborative Writing: Poetry — Francine Ringold

Craft Talk

Thursday, December 1st, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

BIPOC Women: Claim Your Voice, Empower Your Writing — Jackie Graves, Sandra Hunter (moderator), Marianela Medrano, Lynne Thompson

Panel Discussion

For more information, visit our website or join us on Facebook or Twitter

Fall 2022 Virtual Creative Writing Programming


Thursday, September 29th, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

Ask Us Anything: Editing and Publishing Q&A — Cassidy McCants, Eilis O’Neal
Q&A Session (Maximum Participants: 98)

Participation Fee: $5, includes a digital copy of Nimrod’s fall issue, Awards 44

Have questions about getting your work ready to submit or about the publishing industry in general? Want to know what catches an editor’s eye or turns them off your work? Join Nimrod’s Editor-in-Chief, Eilis O’Neal, and Associate Editor, Cassidy McCants, for answers about anything and everything publishing. Editing, revising, the role of literary agents, writing query letters, traditional vs. small press vs. self-publishing, using social media—it’s all on the table in this open Q&A session!

Cassidy McCants received her M.F.A. in fiction writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts. She is an Associate Editor with Nimrod and is the creator/editor of Apple in the Dark. Her work has appeared in The Lascaux Review, Liars’ League NYC, Gravel, and elsewhere. She won the 2020 Innovative Short Fiction Contest from The Conium Review.

Eilis O’Neal has worked at Nimrod for over twenty years and is currently the journal’s Editor-in-Chief. She is also the author of the young adult fantasy novel The False Princess, and her short fantasy has appeared in Strange Horizons, Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, and other publications.

Ends on This opportunity will close after 98 submissions have been received.$5.00
$5.00

Fall 2022 Virtual Creative Writing Programming


Thursday, October 27th, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

Surprise in Fiction — Christopher Murphy

Craft Talk (Maximum attendees: 98)

Participation Fee: $5, includes a digital copy of Nimrod’s fall issue, Awards 44

Surprise is one of the most compelling, and consistently enjoyable, aspects of fiction. From plot twists to character revelations, tonal shifts to leaps in language, the element of surprise makes for memorable stories. We’ll look at the mechanics of the plot twist (of course), but also how writers create surprising characters, how compression and concision can lead to swift atmospheric shifts, and how language can be deployed acrobatically to keep stories fresh.

Christopher Murphy received his M.F.A. from the University of Arkansas and teaches creative writing at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma. His work has been published at Gulf Coast (online), This Land, Jellyfish Review, Necessary Fiction, and decomP among others. He has a collection of flash fiction, Burning All the Time, from Mongrel Empire Press. He is a member of the Nimrod Editorial Board.

Sunday, October 30th, 2:00 p.m., Central Time

The 2022 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction: A Reading with Toni Jensen, Ellen Rhudy, and Treena Thibodeau

Reading and Author Chat (Maximum attendees: 96)

Free and open to the public

Join us as we celebrate the winners of Nimrod’s 44th Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction: First Prize-winner Treena Thibodeau and Second Prize-winner Ellen Rhudy. Treena and Ellen will read their winning stories and then chat with 2022 fiction judge Toni Jensen about fiction, their tips for aspiring writers, what’s next for each of them, and more. We’ll finish the celebration with a fiction reading by Toni Jensen.

Toni Jensen, judge for Nimrod’s 2022 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, is the author of Carry, a memoir-in-essays about gun violence, land and Indigenous women’s lives. An NEA Creative Writing Fellowship recipient in 2020, she has published essays in Orion, Catapult, and Ecotone. She is also the author of the short story collection From the Hilltop. She teaches creative writing and translation at the University of Arkansas and at the Institute of American Indian Arts’s low-residency M.F.A. program. She won Nimrod’s 2006 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction for her story “At the Powwow Hotel.” She is Métis.

Ellen Rhudy lives in Columbus, Ohio, where she is an M.F.A. Candidate in Fiction at Ohio State University and Fiction Editor at The Journal. She was the second prize-winner of Nimrod’s 2018 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction, and her work has appeared in Northwest Review, Story, Split Lip, and The Cincinnati Review. She recently completed a collection of stories and is working on a novel.

Treena Thibodeau’s work has appeared in The Lascaux Review, Barrelhouse, Pithead Chapel, Hobart, Olit, Atticus Review, The Rumpus, and Vol. 1 Brooklyn, and has received support from the Vermont Studio Center and the Gulkistan Center in Iceland. She directs the reading series TGI (www.TGIcast.com) and holds an M.F.A. in fiction from Columbia University.

Saturday, November 5th, 1:00 p.m., Central Time

The 2022 Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry: A Reading with Kaveh Bassiri, Lory Bedikian, and Angela Kirby

Reading and Author Chat (Maximum attendees: 96)

Free and open to the public

Join us as we celebrate the winners of Nimrod’s 44th Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry: First Prize-winner Lory Bedikian and Second Prize-winner Angela Kirby, who will read from their winning poems. 2022 Pablo Neruda Prize judge Kaveh Bassiri will then join them to discuss poetry, tips for aspiring writers, what’s next for each of them, and more. The celebration will conclude with a poetry reading by Kaveh Bassiri.

Kaveh Bassiri is the author of 99 Names of Exile, winner of the 2019 Anzaldúa Poetry Prize, and Elementary English, winner of the 2020 Rick Campbell Chapbook Prize. His poems have been published in a number of anthologies, including Best American Poetry 2020, Best New Poets 2020, The Heart of a Stranger (2020), Essential Voices: Poetry of Iran and Its Diaspora (2021), and Somewhere We Are Human (2022). They can also be found in Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, Virginia Quarterly Review, Copper Nickel, Poetry Northwest, Nimrod, and The Cincinnati Review. He is the recipient of 2022-2023 Tulsa Artist Fellowship, a 2021 Individual Artist Fellowship from the Arkansas Arts Council, and a 2019 translation fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Lory Bedikian’s The Book of Lamenting won the Philip Levine Prize for Poetry. Her work is published in Tin House, The Los Angeles Review, Northwest Review, Poets.org, BOULEVARD, The Adroit Journal, Orion, wildness, Poetry Northwest, and Border Lines: Poems of Migration, and was featured in the Poetry Unbound podcast. She received a 2021 grant from the Money for Women Fund.

Angela Kirby graduated from Duke University with a B.A. in Creative Writing. Her publications include the Humber Literary Review, Another & Another: An Anthology of The Grind, Seam|Ripper, Roanoke Review, and Lament for the Dead. She writes in the mountains of North Carolina.

Fall 2022 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

Saturday, November 12th, 2:00 p.m., Central Time

Collaborative Writing: Poetry — Francine Ringold

Craft Talk (Maximum attendees: 98)

Participation Fee: $5, includes a digital copy of Nimrod’s fall issue, Awards 44

Collaborative writing belies the all too popular concept that one mind is responsible for the resulting work of art. If we are alive to the world, we are always relating to and collaborating with something, whether it is with another artist, with another art form, with history, or with possibility. In this interactive session, we’ll look at ways to write collaboratively and engage in exercises with partners to get our creative juices flowing. Attendees are welcome to sign up alone or with an established writing partner, and everyone will be able to participate in the exercises.

Francine Ringold served two terms as Poet Laureate of Oklahoma and 47 years as Nimrod’s Editor-in-Chief. She is now Nimrod’s Senior Advisory Editor. She has received The Oklahoma Book Award and the Women in Communications Award. Her publications include The Trouble with Voices, Still Dancing, and, most recently, The Way We See Now: A Collaboration of Photography and Poetry, a collaboration with Sam Joyner.

Fall 2022 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

Thursday, December 1st, 7:00 p.m., Central Time

BIPOC Women: Claim Your Voice, Empower Your Writing — Jackie Graves, Sandra Hunter (moderator), Marianela Medrano, Yasamin Safarzedeh, and Lynne Thompson

Panel Discussion (Maximum attendees: 50)

Participation Fee: $5, includes a digital copy of Nimrod’s fall issue, Awards 44

Join us for a timely discussion about claiming the power in your voice as a BIPOC woman writer. We’ll talk about ways to claim your voice, empower your writing, and more at this panel discussion. The overturning of Roe v. Wade is destructive for all women, but particularly for those who have few choices, whether geographical, financial, or a combination. Many of those women are Black, Indigenous, and people of color. The way we raise our voices will shape the values of this generation and the next, and it’s vital, now more than ever, for BIPOC women’s voices to be heard.

Jackie Graves is a light-worker, shamanista, priestess, and soul voice activator. She is a writer and an English professor at Laney College.

Sandra Hunter is a certified Life Coach and the owner of Wild Women Leaders of Color, an organization dedicated to allowing BIPOC women to heal through story. She is a member of Nimrod’s Editorial Board and teaches writing at Portland Literary Arts in Portland, Oregon.

Marianela Medrano, Ph.D., LPC, CPT, is a certified poetry therapist and the owner of Palabra Counseling and Training Center. She is also part of the faculty program for the Southwestern College & New Earth Institute mentoring program in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Yasamin Safarzedeh is the Program Director at Kimball Jenkins Estate and School of Art, New Hampshire. She is also an artist, advisor, and cross cultural liaison coordinator. She is a tireless advocate for equal rights to historically underserved populations. She coordinates local activities that better neighborhoods using empathetic and equity based approaches.

Lynne Thompson is the 2021-2022 poet laureate for Los Angeles. She trained as a lawyer and is on the board for the Los Angeles Review of Books and Cave Canem.

Order a one- or two-year digital subscription to Nimrod International Journal.

Digital subscriptions will be sent by email as PDFs.

Order a one- or two-year domestic print subscription to Nimrod International Journal.

If you live outside the U.S. and would like to subscribe to Nimrod, please email nimrod@utulsa.edu with your mailing address. We will then send you specific information about the shipping cost for your subscription and a link to subscribe. 

Order a digital sample issue to acquaint yourself with the journal or a specific back issue of interest to you. All digital issues are in PDF format. 

Currently available digital issues:

What Now?: The Future We Make, Vol. 65, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2022

Awards 43, Vol. 65., No 1, Fall/Winter 2021

Endings and Beginnings, Vol 64, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2021

Awards 42, Vol. 64, No. 1, Fall/Winter 2020

Words on Play, Vol. 63, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2020

Awards 41, Vol. 63, No. 1, Fall/Winter 2019

Voices of the Middle East and North Africa, Vol. 62, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2019

Order sample print issue(s) to acquaint yourself with the journal or specific back issues of interest to you.

Please note that the availability of specific back issues is variable. You may email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu to check the availability of specific back issues, and we recommend doing so for back issues that are more than 5 years old.

Orders requiring international shipping require addition postage fees. If your order would require international shipping, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your name and full address. We will then respond with the total cost and a link to our international shipping form.


Our Back Issue Grab Bag contains two random back issues of Nimrod for just $2.00 each plus shipping. It's a great way to familiarize yourself with the magazine and see a range of what we've published!

Please note that our most recent issue is not included in the Back Issue Grab Bag. To receive our most recent issue, you must order a single digital or print issue using the appropriate order form.

BODY LANGUAGE

For our Spring/Summer 2023 issue, Body Language, Nimrod International Journal invites creative nonfiction pieces and creative nonfiction translations about the body.

We live inside our bodies. They are a vital part of how we experience the world, the source of some of our greatest pleasure and greatest pain. They are constantly changing, sometimes in ways that bring us joy and sometimes in ways that we find distressing. We use our bodies as a way—quite literally—to reach out to others. They are what other people observe of us, and they can become canvases that show our identities, moods, and beliefs, but we can also feel trapped inside them. They both represent and misrepresent who and what we think we are.

In this issue, we want to explore any and all ideas about the body. Indeed, we may say “the body” in our suggestions below, but we especially wish to acknowledge and embrace that there is no one body, that our bodies, the way we use them and the way they feel, span an astonishing range of experience. Each of us lives in and as a particular body, and each of our bodies has its own stories to tell.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that explores ideas of the body in all its forms. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

· Work that celebrates all aspects of the body

· Work about the pleasure that the body can bring us via touch, eating, sex, appetite, physical activity, etc.

· Work about pain, injury, or illness and how it affects our bodies, minds, and lives

· Work about specific parts of the body

· Work about the intersection of body and identity, including explorations of race, transgender and nonbinary bodies, bodies of all sizes, and bodies with disability or physical difference

· Work about changing bodies, including work about aging; work about pregnancy, miscarriage, and giving birth; work about dysphoria and transition; work about growth or shrinkage; and work about body embellishment

· Work about the body as outward expression and performance

· Work about the body as a vehicle for creative and artistic work

· Work about the body as a means of communication, from body language to sign language

· Work about physicality in all its forms

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope that you will surprise us with additional ideas that explore the concept of our bodies in new and imaginative ways.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for this issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

· Creative nonfiction may be up to 7,500 words.

· All work must be previously unpublished.

· Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, translators are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.

· Prose should be typed, double-spaced, one side of plain white paper only. 

· For those submitting online: Please submit work online under the theme category at: nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit. A $3 fee is charged for online submissions to cover the administrative costs associated with those submissions. Postal submissions are free.

· If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Manuscripts will be accepted beginning June 1, 2022.

Postmark deadline: October 1, 2022

Publication date: Spring 2023

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

For those submitting by mail: Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2023 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.

Send postal manuscripts to:

Nimrod Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

Questions: Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

BODY LANGUAGE

For our Spring/Summer 2023 issue, Body Language, Nimrod International Journal invites short stories and short story translations about the body.

We live inside our bodies. They are a vital part of how we experience the world, the source of some of our greatest pleasure and greatest pain. They are constantly changing, sometimes in ways that bring us joy and sometimes in ways that we find distressing. We use our bodies as a way—quite literally—to reach out to others. They are what other people observe of us, and they can become canvases that show our identities, moods, and beliefs, but we can also feel trapped inside them. They both represent and misrepresent who and what we think we are.

In this issue, we want to explore any and all ideas about the body. Indeed, we may say “the body” in our suggestions below, but we especially wish to acknowledge and embrace that there is no one body, that our bodies, the way we use them and the way they feel, span an astonishing range of experience. Each of us lives in and as a particular body, and each of our bodies has its own stories to tell.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that explores ideas of the body in all its forms. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

· Work that celebrates all aspects of the body

· Work about the pleasure that the body can bring us via touch, eating, sex, appetite, physical activity, etc.

· Work about pain, injury, or illness and how it affects our bodies, minds, and lives

· Work about specific parts of the body

· Work about the intersection of body and identity, including explorations of race, transgender and nonbinary bodies, bodies of all sizes, and bodies with disability or physical difference

· Work about changing bodies, including work about aging; work about pregnancy, miscarriage, and giving birth; work about dysphoria and transition; work about growth or shrinkage; and work about body embellishment

· Work about the body as outward expression and performance

· Work about the body as a vehicle for creative and artistic work

· Work about the body as a means of communication, from body language to sign language

· Work about physicality in all its forms

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope that you will surprise us with additional ideas that explore the concept of our bodies in new and imaginative ways.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for this issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

· Fiction may be up to 7,500 words.

· All work must be previously unpublished.

· Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, translators are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.

· Prose should be typed, double-spaced, one side of plain white paper only. 

· For those submitting online: Please submit work online under the theme category at: nimrodjournal.submittable.com/submit. A $3 fee is charged for online submissions to cover the administrative costs associated with those submissions. Postal submissions are free. 

· If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Manuscripts will be accepted beginning June 1, 2022.

Postmark deadline: October 1, 2022

Publication date: Spring 2023

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

For those submitting by mail: Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2023 Theme.” Send a SASE for response.

Send postal manuscripts to:

Nimrod Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

Questions: Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

BODY LANGUAGE

For our Spring/Summer 2023 issue, Body Language, Nimrod International Journal invites poems and poetry translations about the body.

We live inside our bodies. They are a vital part of how we experience the world, the source of some of our greatest pleasure and greatest pain. They are constantly changing, sometimes in ways that bring us joy and sometimes in ways that we find distressing. We use our bodies as a way—quite literally—to reach out to others. They are what other people observe of us, and they can become canvases that show our identities, moods, and beliefs, but we can also feel trapped inside them. They both represent and misrepresent who and what we think we are.

In this issue, we want to explore any and all ideas about the body. Indeed, we may say “the body” in our suggestions below, but we especially wish to acknowledge and embrace that there is no one body, that our bodies, the way we use them and the way they feel, span an astonishing range of experience. Each of us lives in and as a particular body, and each of our bodies has its own stories to tell.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that explores ideas of the body in all its forms. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

· Work that celebrates all aspects of the body

· Work about the pleasure that the body can bring us via touch, eating, sex, appetite, physical activity, etc.

· Work about pain, injury, or illness and how it affects our bodies, minds, and lives

· Work about specific parts of the body

· Work about the intersection of body and identity, including explorations of race, transgender and nonbinary bodies, bodies of all sizes, and bodies with disability or physical difference

· Work about changing bodies, including work about aging; work about pregnancy, miscarriage, and giving birth; work about dysphoria and transition; work about growth or shrinkage; and work about body embellishment

· Work about the body as outward expression and performance

· Work about the body as a vehicle for creative and artistic work

· Work about the body as a means of communication, from body language to sign language

· Work about physicality in all its forms

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope that you will surprise us with additional ideas that explore the concept of our bodies in new and imaginative ways.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for this issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

· Poetry may be up to 7 pages.

· All work must be previously unpublished.

· Poetry should be typed, one side of plain white paper only, no more than one poem per page.

· Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, translators are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.

· For those submitting online: A $3 fee is charged for online submissions to cover the administrative costs associated with those submissions. Postal submissions are free. 

· If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Postmark deadline: October 1, 2022

Publication date: Spring 2023

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

For those submitting by mail: Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2023 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.

Send postal manuscripts to:

Nimrod Journal

The University of Tulsa

800 S. Tucker Dr.

Tulsa, OK 74104

Questions: Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Prose should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
  • Please include your name in the body of the manuscript
  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Stories should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
  • Please include your name in the body of your manuscript
  • Up to 7 pages of poetry
  • All poems should be included in a single file, no more than one poem per page
  • Previously unpublished poems only
  • Please include your name in the body of your manuscript
Nimrod International Journal