PLEASE NOTE: Registration for Two-Day Passes to Nimrod's Conference for Readers and Writers and Write Night tickets will close at 11:59 p.m. on October 7th.

Online Registration for One-Day Passes to Nimrod's Conference for Readers and Writers will close at 11:59 p.m. on October 13th. To register for a One-Day Pass after this time, please come to Late Registration at 9:30 a.m. on October 15th. 


Nimrod International Journal
welcomes submissions of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. We publish two issues annually. Our spring issue is thematic, with the theme announced the preceding fall. Previous themes have included Writers of Age; Range of Light: The Americas; Australia; Who We Are; Islands of the Sea and of the Mind; The Arabic Nations; Mexico/USA; and Crossing Borders. The fall issue features the winners and finalists of our annual Literary Awards. In most cases, both issues also contain work accepted as general submissions throughout the year. 

Format:
Each issue is approximately 200 pages, perfect bound with a four-color cover.
 
General Submissions:
Accepted from January 1st to November 30th each year. Nimrod is closed to general submissions in December. Turn-around time for general submissions is one to five months. Online general submissions have a $3 fee associated with them. 
 
Prose: Work must be previously unpublished. 7,500 words maximum. Double-spaced. We seek vigorous writing with characters that are well developed and dialogue that is realistic without being banal. 
 
Poetry: Work must be previously unpublished. 3-10 pages. One poem per page. Poetry is open to all styles and subjects. We seek poems that go beyond one word or image, honor the impulse to reveal a truth about, or persuasive version of, the inner and outer worlds. 
 
We recommend reading a sample issue before submitting a manuscript.

Thematic Submissions:
Each fall Nimrod announces a theme for the following spring issue. The guidelines for thematic submissions are the same as for general submissions, except that thematic submissions are sometimes accepted in December. (Very occasionally we may choose a theme from previously accepted manuscripts, and then will not announce one for that year.) Online thematic submissions have a $3 fee associated with them.

For the most up-to-date announcements on themes and other submission information, you can subscribe to our email newsletter or join us on Facebook or Twitter. 

Why is there a $3 fee for online general and thematic submissions?

Our $3 fee is not a reading fee, but a fee to cover the administrative costs associated with our online submission system. We believe that it is not higher than what you might spend on a paper submission, once you factor in paper, ink, mailing and return envelopes, and postage. If you do not wish to pay the $3, you may submit via postal mail, as we have no fees associated with postal general and thematic submissions. However, we also offer this alternative as a way to conveniently upload material directly from your computer, as well as to check the status of your submission online. 
 
Payment:
Nimrod always pays with two contributors’ copies. Winners of the Nimrod Literary Awards receive $2,000 for first prize, $1,000 for second prize, and publication.
 
Nimrod Literary Awards:
Annual contest begins January 1 and ends April 30. 

Fiction: 7,500 words maximum (one short story or a self-contained excerpt from a novel)

Poetry: 3-10 pages. One long poem or several shorter poems. 
 
No previously published works or works accepted for publication elsewhere.  Author's name must not appear on the manuscript.  Include a cover sheet with title, author's name, full address, phone & email. 
 
Submitters must be living in the US by October of 2016 to enter the contest. 
 
All finalists will be considered for publication. In addition to publication and the prize money, winners will also be brought to Tulsa for the Awards Ceremony in October. 
 
Subscriptions:
$18.50 – one year (outside USA $20.50); $32 – two years (outside USA $36); institution rates: $30 – one year (outside USA $36). 
 
Sample Issues:
$11 each. 

For more information, visit our website or join us on Facebook or Twitter
$ 3.00

Home. It’s a concept that stretches across all cultures and all times. But what makes a home? Why do we sometimes seek out new homes, or refuse to leave the homes we already have? How do we find—and adapt to—new homes? When is leaving home a choice, when an exile? What happens when we are forced to leave homes we do not necessarily want to abandon? How do we make a place—a house, a country, a continent—into a home? Does home refer primarily to a place, or to the people who live there? Can home be an internal state of mind?

For our Spring/Summer 2017 issue, Leaving Home, Finding Home, Nimrod International Journal is seeking poetry, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home—both leaving home and finding home.

What We Are Seeking:

We invite poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home. We are open to all interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories. Just a few examples of material that would be of interest to us include

  • Work about immigration, especially from first-generation immigrants to or from any country
  • Work from refugees leaving one home to seek another
  • Work from “Third Culture Kids,” those raised in a culture outside their parents’ culture
  • Work from expatriates living in countries not their own
  • Work about age and home, whether stories of young people leaving home for the first time or older people transitioning to new homes
  • Work that explores the connections between families and homes
  • Work about home as a state of mind
  • Work about the environment as home—for humans and for plants and animals
  • Work in translation

We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, including work from writers of color, writers of marginalized orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, physically different writers, and neuroatypical writers. We are especially interested in material from immigrants, migrants, and those raised outside their parents’ culture. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.

The Specifics:

  • Fiction pieces may be up to 7,500 words.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Fiction should be double-spaced with 1” margins on all sides.  
  • Work may be submitted here, or work may be mailed to Nimrod's main address: Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104. Work submitted by mail does not require the $3 online submission fee. If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver. 

Deadline: November 5th, 2016

Publication date: April 2017

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published in print by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine receive two copies of the issues in which their work appears.

Questions?

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu, call (918) 631-3080, or visit us online at www.utulsa.edu/nimrod.

 

 

Home. It’s a concept that stretches across all cultures and all times. But what makes a home? Why do we sometimes seek out new homes, or refuse to leave the homes we already have? How do we find—and adapt to—new homes? When is leaving home a choice, when an exile? What happens when we are forced to leave homes we do not necessarily want to abandon? How do we make a place—a house, a country, a continent—into a home? Does home refer primarily to a place, or to the people who live there? Can home be an internal state of mind?

For our Spring/Summer 2017 issue, Leaving Home, Finding Home, Nimrod International Journal is seeking poetry, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home—both leaving home and finding home.

What We Are Seeking:

We invite poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home. We are open to all interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories. Just a few examples of material that would be of interest to us include

  • Work about immigration, especially from first-generation immigrants to or from any country
  • Work from refugees leaving one home to seek another
  • Work from “Third Culture Kids,” those raised in a culture outside their parents’ culture
  • Work from expatriates living in countries not their own
  • Work about age and home, whether stories of young people leaving home for the first time or older people transitioning to new homes
  • Work that explores the connections between families and homes
  • Work about home as a state of mind
  • Work about the environment as home—for humans and for plants and animals
  • Work in translation

We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, including work from writers of color, writers of marginalized orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, physically different writers, and neuroatypical writers. We are especially interested in material from immigrants, migrants, and those raised outside their parents’ culture. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.

The Specifics:

  • Creative nonfiction pieces may be up to 7,500 words.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Creative nonfiction should be double-spaced with 1” margins on all sides.  
  • Work may be submitted here, or work may be mailed to Nimrod's main address: Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104. Work submitted by mail does not require the $3 online submission fee. If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver. 

Deadline: November 5th, 2016

Publication date: April 2017

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published in print by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine receive two copies of the issues in which their work appears.

Questions?

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu, call (918) 631-3080, or visit us online at www.utulsa.edu/nimrod.

 

 

$ 3.00

Home. It’s a concept that stretches across all cultures and all times. But what makes a home? Why do we sometimes seek out new homes, or refuse to leave the homes we already have? How do we find—and adapt to—new homes? When is leaving home a choice, when an exile? What happens when we are forced to leave homes we do not necessarily want to abandon? How do we make a place—a house, a country, a continent—into a home? Does home refer primarily to a place, or to the people who live there? Can home be an internal state of mind?

For our Spring/Summer 2017 issue, Leaving Home, Finding Home, Nimrod International Journal is seeking poetry, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home—both leaving home and finding home.

What We Are Seeking:

We invite poems, short stories, and creative nonfiction pieces that explore ideas of home. We are open to all interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories. Just a few examples of material that would be of interest to us include

  • Work about immigration, especially from first-generation immigrants to or from any country
  • Work from refugees leaving one home to seek another
  • Work from “Third Culture Kids,” those raised in a culture outside their parents’ culture
  • Work from expatriates living in countries not their own
  • Work about age and home, whether stories of young people leaving home for the first time or older people transitioning to new homes
  • Work that explores the connections between families and homes
  • Work about home as a state of mind
  • Work about the environment as home—for humans and for plants and animals
  • Work in translation

We hope to receive a large variety of material for this issue, including work from writers of color, writers of marginalized orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, physically different writers, and neuroatypical writers. We are especially interested in material from immigrants, migrants, and those raised outside their parents’ culture. Most of all, we hope to be surprised.

We are excited about this issue, so please send your work and/or share this announcement with writing groups and friends. We eagerly anticipate your response.

The Specifics:

  • Up to 8 pages of poetry
  • All poems should be included in one document, one poem per page.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Work may be submitted here, or work may be mailed to Nimrod's main address: Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104. Work submitted by mail does not require the $3 online submission fee. If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver. 

Deadline: November 5th, 2016

Publication date: April 2017

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published in print by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine receive two copies of the issues in which their work appears.

Questions?

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu, call (918) 631-3080, or visit us online at www.utulsa.edu/nimrod.

 

 

Ends on December 1, 2016$ 3.00
$ 3.00
  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Stories should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
Ends on December 1, 2016$ 3.00
$ 3.00
  • Up to 10 pages of poetry
  • All poems should be included in a single file, one poem per page
  • Previously unpublished poems only
Ends on December 1, 2016$ 3.00
$ 3.00
  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Stories should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
Ends in 6 days, 19 hours $ 54.00
$ 54.00
Online Registration for the Nimrod Write Night Author Reception will close at 11:59 p.m. October 7th. 

I wish to purchase a ticket to Nimrod's Write Night Author Reception on October 14th. The Nimrod Write Night Author Reception takes place at 6:00 p.m. at The University of Tulsa's Lorton Performance Center, with the Awards Ceremony and Author Chat following at 7:00 p.m. 

This option is for a ticket for the Write Night Author Reception ONLY. To also sign up for the Conference for Readers and Writers, please select the Two-Day Pass option. 

(Online registration includes a small fee to cover administrative costs. If you do not wish to pay this fee, please print the registration form from our website and mail it to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104.)

Each Write Night ticket includes a copy of either Robin Coste Lewis' Voyage of the Sable Venus or Angela Flournoy's The Turner House. We will try to honor your first choice, but book selection is subject to availability. 
Ends on October 13, 2016$ 11.60 - 65.00
$ 11.60 - 65.00
Online Registration for Nimrod's Conference for Readers and Writers will close at 11:59 p.m. on October 13th. To register after this time, please come to Late Registration at 9:30 a.m. on October 15th. 

I wish to purchase a One-Day Pass to Nimrod's Conference for Readers and Writers on October 14th-15th, 2016. The Conference will take place on the 15th at The University of Tulsa's Allen Chapman Student Union from 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

(Online registration includes a small fee to cover administrative costs. If you do not wish to pay this fee, please print the registration form from our website and mail it to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104.)

Complete Schedule for Saturday, October 15th. 

9:30-10:00 a.m.: Late Registration/Pre-Registered Check In

10:00-10:40 a.m.: PANEL DISCUSSIONS (Concurrent Sessions)*

Rules of Writing: When to Follow Them and When to Break Them
Bryce Emley, Angela Flournoy, Britton Gildersleeve, Toni Jensen, Robin Coste Lewis, Ruth Knafo Setton, Sherry Thomas

Editing and Publishing: Q&A
Chad B. Anderson, Chloe Honum, Markham Johnson, Beth Kephart, Eilis O’Neal, Will Thomas, Brenna Yovanoff

10:45 a.m.-12:00 noon: Morning Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*

Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops I*
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction or nonfiction.  Materials must be uploaded with your registration.  Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.

Dialogue and Code-Switching in Fiction —
Angela Flournoy
Dialogue has a lot of work to do—it should provide context and characterization, drive the narrative forward, and, above all, entertain. We’ll look at several approaches to writing dialogue, and compare how each meets the needs of its narrative, as well as how authors approach code-switching—or the ways that people use language differently depending on whom they’re talking to.

Beginnings and Endings: How We Open and Conclude Our Poems — Bryce Emley and Markham Johnson
Poems are brief—so our beginnings and endings have to stand out. We’ll delve into ways to grab the reader’s attention and refuse to let it go, and we’ll look at Eastern and Western ways of ending poems that leave us with a sense of what writer Jack Myers referred to as “the complementary qualities of surprise and inevitability."

Memoir: Home Is Where the Story Is — Beth Kephart
Every memoir begins or ends with a conception of home: what it is and why it matters. We’ll reflect on home—explore its many meanings, find inspiration from memoirists who take us home, and write toward our own ideas of home and the true stories that begin there.

Chemistry in Romance:
Creating the Sizzle — Sherry Thomas
Chemistry is one of the most important ingredients in a can’t-put-it-down romance. Explore the combustible combination of sexual attraction and intellectual common ground, spiced by emotional connection and emotional conflict, and learn how to create and deepen chemistry, moving from big-picture tools to paragraph-level details.  

Publishing 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Getting Your Work Out There — Eilis O’Neal
Today’s publishing landscape can be confusing, and submitting your work can be a scary prospect. We’ll discuss the basics of publishing, define terms like “cover letter” and “synopsis,” and learn how to submit work to literary agents and literary journals.

12:00-1:30 p.m.: Lunch and Readings by Angela Flournoy and Robin Coste Lewis

1:35-2:50 p.m.: Afternoon Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*

Literary and Commercial Fiction: Working the Genre Divide —
Toni Jensen
Writers of literary fiction often are told their work isn’t commercial enough, while writers of commercial fiction often are criticized for their lack of literary finesse.  But it doesn’t have to be an either/or game. We’ll develop strategies for working genre-style plots while still employing the fine imagery and inventive language of literary fiction.

The Power of Place: How to Make Your Setting Sing  —
Chad B. Anderson and Ruth Knafo Setton
Whether you’re peeking through the keyhole of your imagination at an enchanted kingdom, peering through binoculars at a foreign street, or describing your own backyard, world-building is a critical element in writing. Explore ways to enhance a sense of place, using it to develop characters and plot, heighten suspense and intensify conflict, and create a world rich in sensory details.

Poetry & Photography — Robin Coste Lewis
While poetry and photography are different art forms, they actually have a lot in common. We’ll explore the relationship between memory and visual art using photographs—and learn how one can enhance the other.  (Please choose one photograph to bring with you on the day of the workshop.)

Poetry: Depth and Beauty in Everyday Moments — Chloe Honum
Some of the best poems center on seemingly small moments—the overheard sound of typing in another room, the arrival of the mail carrier, or boarding the subway. We’ll discover how poets use imagery, simile, and tone to dive into such moments and reveal their depth and beauty, and learn how the ordinary moments that resonate with us individually can become universal songs.

Mystery: The Fine Art of the Fight Scene — Will Thomas
Spectacular fight scenes can make your mystery or thriller shine, but writing specific movements and keeping the action clear can be harder than it looks.  We’ll work through the ins and outs of a dynamic fight scene to make your scenes kick butt!

Finding the Door to the Fantastic: Young Adult
Fantasy and Horror — Brenna Yovanoff
Strangeness abounds in fantasy and horror novels, but the weirder you’re going to be, the more important it is to give your readers an easy way into your story. Learn how to incorporate familiar settings and everyday details as the door into your magical or terrifying world.

3:00-4:00 p.m.: READINGS & EDITING WORKSHOPS

Invitational Readings
Chloe Honum, Toni Jensen, Beth Kephart, Sherry Thomas, Will Thomas, Brenna Yovanoff

Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops II*
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction or nonfiction.  Materials must be uploaded with your registration.   Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.

*Registrants may attend one morning panel discussion, one morning masterclass, and one afternoon masterclass, as well as the entire reading from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  Afternoon one-on-one editing participants may move to and from their sessions to the Invitational Readings as time permits.

The full Saturday conference package includes workshops, panel discussions, readings, lunch, and one-on-one editing sessions. The lunch menu includes vegetarian options. 

$ 107.00
Registration for the Two-Day Passes will close at 11:59 p.m. on October 7th. 

I wish to purchase a Two-Day Pass to Nimrod's Write Night Author Reception and Conference for Readers and Writers on October 14th-15th, 2016. The Nimrod Write Night Author Reception will take place on the 14th at 6:00 p.m. at The University of Tulsa's Lorton Performance Center. The Conference will take place on the 15th at The University of Tulsa's Allen Chapman Student Union from 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Scholarships are not available for the Two-Day Pass.

(Online registration includes a small fee to cover administrative costs. If you do not wish to pay this fee, please print the registration form from our website and mail it to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK 74104.)

Complete Schedule for Saturday, October 15th. 

9:30-10:00 a.m.: Late Registration/Pre-Registered Check In

10:00-10:40 a.m.: PANEL DISCUSSIONS (Concurrent Sessions)*

Rules of Writing: When to Follow Them and When to Break Them
Bryce Emley, Angela Flournoy, Britton Gildersleeve, Toni Jensen, Robin Coste Lewis, Ruth Knafo Setton, Sherry Thomas

Editing and Publishing: Q&A
Chad B. Anderson, Chloe Honum, Markham Johnson, Beth Kephart, Eilis O’Neal, Will Thomas, Brenna Yovanoff

10:45 a.m.-12:00 noon: Morning Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*

Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops I*
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction or nonfiction.  Materials must be uploaded with your registration.  Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.

Dialogue and Code-Switching in Fiction —
Angela Flournoy
Dialogue has a lot of work to do—it should provide context and characterization, drive the narrative forward, and, above all, entertain. We’ll look at several approaches to writing dialogue, and compare how each meets the needs of its narrative, as well as how authors approach code-switching—or the ways that people use language differently depending on whom they’re talking to.

Beginnings and Endings: How We Open and Conclude Our Poems — Bryce Emley and Markham Johnson
Poems are brief—so our beginnings and endings have to stand out. We’ll delve into ways to grab the reader’s attention and refuse to let it go, and we’ll look at Eastern and Western ways of ending poems that leave us with a sense of what writer Jack Myers referred to as “the complementary qualities of surprise and inevitability."

Memoir: Home Is Where the Story Is — Beth Kephart
Every memoir begins or ends with a conception of home: what it is and why it matters. We’ll reflect on home—explore its many meanings, find inspiration from memoirists who take us home, and write toward our own ideas of home and the true stories that begin there.

Chemistry in Romance:
Creating the Sizzle — Sherry Thomas
Chemistry is one of the most important ingredients in a can’t-put-it-down romance. Explore the combustible combination of sexual attraction and intellectual common ground, spiced by emotional connection and emotional conflict, and learn how to create and deepen chemistry, moving from big-picture tools to paragraph-level details.  

Publishing 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Getting Your Work Out There — Eilis O’Neal
Today’s publishing landscape can be confusing, and submitting your work can be a scary prospect. We’ll discuss the basics of publishing, define terms like “cover letter” and “synopsis,” and learn how to submit work to literary agents and literary journals.

12:00-1:30 p.m.: Lunch and Readings by Angela Flournoy and Robin Coste Lewis

1:35-2:50 p.m.: Afternoon Masterclasses (Concurrent Sessions)*

Literary and Commercial Fiction: Working the Genre Divide —
Toni Jensen
Writers of literary fiction often are told their work isn’t commercial enough, while writers of commercial fiction often are criticized for their lack of literary finesse.  But it doesn’t have to be an either/or game. We’ll develop strategies for working genre-style plots while still employing the fine imagery and inventive language of literary fiction.

The Power of Place: How to Make Your Setting Sing  —
Chad B. Anderson and Ruth Knafo Setton
Whether you’re peeking through the keyhole of your imagination at an enchanted kingdom, peering through binoculars at a foreign street, or describing your own backyard, world-building is a critical element in writing. Explore ways to enhance a sense of place, using it to develop characters and plot, heighten suspense and intensify conflict, and create a world rich in sensory details.

Poetry & Photography — Robin Coste Lewis
While poetry and photography are different art forms, they actually have a lot in common. We’ll explore the relationship between memory and visual art using photographs—and learn how one can enhance the other.  (Please choose one photograph to bring with you on the day of the workshop.)

Poetry: Depth and Beauty in Everyday Moments — Chloe Honum
Some of the best poems center on seemingly small moments—the overheard sound of typing in another room, the arrival of the mail carrier, or boarding the subway. We’ll discover how poets use imagery, simile, and tone to dive into such moments and reveal their depth and beauty, and learn how the ordinary moments that resonate with us individually can become universal songs.

Mystery: The Fine Art of the Fight Scene — Will Thomas
Spectacular fight scenes can make your mystery or thriller shine, but writing specific movements and keeping the action clear can be harder than it looks.  We’ll work through the ins and outs of a dynamic fight scene to make your scenes kick butt!

Finding the Door to the Fantastic: Young Adult
Fantasy and Horror — Brenna Yovanoff
Strangeness abounds in fantasy and horror novels, but the weirder you’re going to be, the more important it is to give your readers an easy way into your story. Learn how to incorporate familiar settings and everyday details as the door into your magical or terrifying world.

3:00-4:00 p.m.: READINGS & EDITING WORKSHOPS

Invitational Readings
Chloe Honum, Toni Jensen, Beth Kephart, Sherry Thomas, Will Thomas, Brenna Yovanoff

Hands-on One-on-One Editing Workshops II*
Meet one on one with a Nimrod editor who will help you revise your work.  Submit 2-3 pages of poetry or 4-5 pages of fiction or nonfiction.  Materials must be uploaded with your registration.   Each one-on-one editing session is 15 minutes long.

*Registrants may attend one morning panel discussion, one morning masterclass, and one afternoon masterclass, as well as the entire reading from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.  Afternoon one-on-one editing participants may move to and from their sessions to the Invitational Readings as time permits.

The full Saturday conference package includes workshops, panel discussions, readings, lunch, and one-on-one editing sessions. The lunch menu includes vegetarian options.