Nimrod International Journal welcomes submissions of poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction. We publish two issues annually. Our spring issue is thematic, with the theme announced the preceding fall. Previous themes have included Writers of Age; Range of Light: The Americas; Australia; Who We Are; Islands of the Sea and of the Mind; The Arabic Nations; Mexico/USA; and Crossing Borders. The fall issue features the winners and finalists of our annual Literary Awards. In most cases, both issues also contain work accepted as general submissions throughout the year.

Format:
Each issue is approximately 200 pages, perfect bound with a four-color cover.

 

General Submissions:

Accepted from January 1st to November 30th each year. Nimrod is closed to general submissions in December. Turn-around time for general submissions is one to five months. Online general submissions have a $3 fee associated with them. 

Prose: Work must be previously unpublished. 7,500 words maximum. Double-spaced. We seek vigorous writing with characters that are well developed and dialogue that is realistic without being banal. 

Poetry: Work must be previously unpublished. 3-7 pages. One poem per page. Poetry is open to all styles and subjects. We seek poems that go beyond one word or image, honor the impulse to reveal a truth about, or persuasive version of, the inner and outer worlds. 

We recommend reading a sample issue before submitting a manuscript.

Thematic Submissions:

Each fall Nimrod announces a theme for the following spring issue. The guidelines for thematic submissions are the same as for general submissions, except that thematic submissions are sometimes accepted in December. (Very occasionally we may choose a theme from previously accepted manuscripts, and then will not announce one for that year.) Online thematic submissions have a $3 fee associated with them.

For the most up-to-date announcements on themes and other submission information, you can subscribe to our email newsletter or join us on Facebook or Twitter. 


Why is there a $3 fee for online general and thematic submissions?

Our $3 fee is not a reading fee, but a fee to cover the administrative costs associated with our online submission system. We believe that it is not higher than what you might spend on a paper submission, once you factor in paper, ink, mailing, return envelopes, and postage. If you do not wish to pay the $3, you may submit via postal mail, as we have no fees associated with postal general and thematic submissions. However, we also offer this alternative as a way to conveniently upload material directly from your computer, as well as to check the status of your submission online.
 

Payment:

For work printed in our two 2020 issues, Words on Play and Awards 42, we will pay $10/page, with a maximum payment of $200. Visual artists whose work appears internally will also be compensated at a rate of $10 per image used; front cover artists will be paid $100 for their work. All contributors will also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears. Work selected for publication through our two annual contests, the Nimrod Literary Awards and the Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers, will also receive this payment (though monetary prizes for winners will remain the same: $2,000 and $1,000 for the Literary Awards; $500 for the Francine Ringold Awards).

 

Nimrod Literary Awards:

Annual contest begins January 1 and ends April 1.

Fiction: 7,500 words maximum (one short story or a self-contained excerpt from a novel)

Poetry: 3-10 pages. One long poem or several shorter poems.

No previously published works or works accepted for publication elsewhere.  Author's name must not appear on the manuscript.  Include a cover sheet with title, author's name, full address, phone & email.

Submitters must be living in the US by October of the contest year to enter.

All finalists will be considered for publication. In addition to publication and the prize money, winners will also be brought to Tulsa for the Awards Ceremony in October (or, in 2021, will take part in a virtual Awards Ceremony and Reading with our final judges).

 

The Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers

Annual contest begins May 1 and ends July 15. 


Eligibility: The Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers honor the work of writers at the beginning of their careers. They are open only to writers whose work has not appeared or is not scheduled to appear in more than 2 publications. (Self-published works, works with a distribution of less than 100 copies, and journalistic articles are not considered toward the count of 2 publications.)

Prizes: $500 prizes will be awarded in both the fiction and poetry categories, and the winning manuscripts will appear in the spring issue of Nimrod. Winners will have the chance to work with the Nimrod board of editors to refine and edit their manuscripts before publication.

Contest Rules

Fiction: 5,000 words maximum (one short story or a self-contained excerpt from a novel)

Poetry: Up to 5 pages. One long poem or several shorter poems.

No previously published works or works accepted for publication elsewhere.  Author's name must not appear on the manuscript.  Include a cover sheet with title, author's name, full address, phone & email.
The Francine Ringold Awards are open internationally.

 

Subscriptions:

$18.50 – one year (outside USA $20.50); $32 – two years (outside USA $36); institution rates: $30 – one year (outside USA $36). 

 

Sample Issues:

$11 each.

For more information, visit our website or join us on Facebook or Twitter

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to sign up for "End Words Are a Beginning."

This poetry and prose craft talk/workshop will take place via Zoom on Sunday, October 10th, at 2:00 p.m. CDT.

It may sound counterintuitive, but we often do our best work when we don’t know exactly what we are doing or where we are going.  In this participatory workshop, you’ll learn to extend your writing reach into the unknown places that reside in your mind/body. We’ll then introduce exercises that will help us mesh form and content using just a bit of effort and a great deal of awareness. By the end of the workshop, you’ll have created the beginning of a poem or the first paragraph of a prose work.

As part of the exercises, several participants will be asked to volunteer to name and, if you wish, read your favorite poem of one page or less or opening paragraph of a prose work and briefly explain why it is a favorite. Favorite works should be by an author other than yourself. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants may volunteer to read the work they have created during the session. The workshop will also involve some simply physical movement guided by the instructor.

Francine Ringold served two terms as Poet Laureate of Oklahoma and 47 years as Nimrod’s Editor-in-Chief. She is now Nimrod’s Senior Advisory Editor. She has received The Oklahoma Book Award and the Women in Communications Award. Her publications include The Trouble with Voices, Still Dancing, and, most recently, The Way We See Now: A Collaboration of Photography and Poetry, a collaboration with Sam Joyner.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to sign up for "Stillness in Fiction" 

Stillness is essential to storytelling. Think about a lingering note in a song or a lull in a film’s action. These moments allow us to breathe, to consider, and to experience relief. But in writing, where words must continue to carry a narrative forward, how can we simulate stillness? This workshop will examine ways to demonstrate stillness in fiction and guide you through a series of prompts to incorporate quiet moments into your own writing.

Katy Mullins’s work has appeared in or is forthcoming from such journals as The Baltimore Review, Brevity, and Hong Kong Review, among others. She serves on the Nimrod editorial board and currently lives in Washington, D.C.

Anita Trimbur holds a B.A. in English from the University of Pittsburgh. Her fiction has been longlisted for the SmokeLong Quarterly Award for Flash Fiction, and she serves on the Nimrodeditorial board. Currently, she is working on her novel.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to attend  "The 2021 Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry: A Reading with Emily Rose Cole, Geffrey Davis, and Julie Marie Wade." 

Join us as we celebrate the winners of Nimrod’s 43rd Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry: First Prize-winner Emily Rose Cole and Second Prize-winner Julie Marie Wade. Emily and Julie will read from their winning poems, and then 2021 Pablo Neruda Prize judge Geffrey Davis will join them to discuss poetry, tips for aspiring writer, what’s next for them, and more. The celebration will conclude with a poetry reading by Geffrey.

Emily Rose Cole is the author of Thunderhead, a collection forthcoming from University of Wisconsin Press, and Love & a Loaded Gun, a chapbook of poems in women’s voices from Minerva Rising. Her work has appeared in American Life in Poetry, Best New Poets 2018, and Poet Lore, among other publications. She is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Cincinnati.

Geffrey Davis is the author of Night Angler (BOA Editions, 2019), winner of the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets, and Revising the Storm ​(BOA Editions, 2014), winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in Crazyhorse, The New York Times MagazineThe New Yorker, Ploughshares, and elsewhere. He is the recipient of the Anne Halley Poetry Prize, the Dogwood Prize in Poetry, the Porter Fund Literary Prize, and the Wabash Prize for Poetry. He currently teaches with the Program in Creative Writing & Translation at the University of Arkansas and with The Rainier Writing Workshop, Pacific Lutheran University's low-residency M.F.A. program.  Geffrey also serves as Poetry Editor for Iron Horse Literary Review.

Julie Marie Wade is the author of 13 collections of poetry and prose, most recently Skirted: Poems (The Words Works, 2021) and the book-length lyric essay, Just an Ordinary Woman Breathing (The Ohio State University Press, 2020). A winner of the Marie Alexander Poetry Series and the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Memoir, she teaches in the creative writing program at Florida International University and makes her home with Angie Griffin in Dania Beach.

While all readings are free of charge, contributions are deeply appreciated and help us offer programs like these. We understand, especially in these times of pandemic, that not all writers can afford to make a donation, and we welcome you to attend whether or not you can donate at this time. But the pandemic has been especially hard on non-profit arts organizations like Nimrod, cutting into our normal revenue streams in many ways, and if you can make a donation, it will make a big difference to our journal operations and to our ability to offer programs like these. Contributions can be made below.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to attend  "The 2021 Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction: A Reading with Celine Aenlle-Rocha, Rilla Askew, and Paula Closson Buck." 

Join us as we celebrate the winners of Nimrod’s 43rd Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction: First Prize-winner Celine Aenlle-Rocha and Second Prize-winner Paula Closson Buck. Celine and Paula will read their winning stories and then chat 2021 fiction judge Rilla Askew about fiction, their tips for aspiring writer, what’s next for them, and more. We’ll finish the celebration with a fiction reading by Rilla.

Celine Aenlle-Rocha is a writer based in New York City, where she is a candidate for an M.F.A. in Creative Writing at Columbia University. Her work is published or forthcoming in Joyland, Puerto del Sol, Tahoma Literary Review, The Acentos Review, and elsewhere. She has received fellowships from Columbia University, Martha’s Vineyard Institute for Creative Writing, and Art Farm.

Rilla Askew is the author of four novels, a book of stories, and a collection of creative nonfiction. Her novel about the Tulsa Race Massacre, Fire in Beulah, received the American Book Award in 2002. Askew received a 2009 Arts and Letters Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and currently teaches creative writing at the University of Oklahoma.

Paula Closson Buck was a Fulbright Scholar in Cyprus in 2014, and she is an NEA Fellow in Fiction for 2020-21. Her first novel, Summer on the Cold War Planet, was published in 2015 by Fomite Press. Her short stories have appeared in The Southern ReviewPloughshares, and Kenyon Review.

While all readings are free of charge, contributions are deeply appreciated and help us offer programs like these. We understand, especially in these times of pandemic, that not all writers can afford to make a donation, and we welcome you to attend whether or not you can donate at this time. But the pandemic has been especially hard on non-profit arts organizations like Nimrod, cutting into our normal revenue streams in many ways, and if you can make a donation, it will make a big difference to our journal operations and to our ability to offer programs like these. Contributions can be made below.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to sign up for "Windows & Doors & Things: Building Relationships with the Material World in Isolation and Solitude."

Last May, at the onset of the pandemic, Time magazine did an entire article on the epidemic of loneliness in the United States. Even as our global society expands, isolation and loneliness increase; and, as the article indicated, it can be difficult for people to talk about. After a year of sheltering, however, we are collectively talking about our loneliness more than ever and it is important to keep this dialogue going. Art can help us do that.

For this workshop, we’ll think about the spaces we have inhabited that testify to times of isolation and loneliness. This is an opportunity to take some time to reflect on some of the stressors carried in solitude over this past year and build a new relationship with those stressors. Rather than imagining those spaces as testament to our aloneness, however, we’ll consider their animation and relational qualities by exploring a few poems and building our own relationships, through writing, with the objects and spaces we lived with over this past year.

Kimberly Ann Priest is the author of The Optimist Shelters in Place (Harbor Editions 2022), Slaughter the One Bird (Sundress 2021), Still Life (PANK, 2020), Parrot Flower (Glass, 2020) and White Goat Black Sheep (FLP, 2018). Winner of the 2019 Heartland Poetry Prize from New American Press, her work has appeared in North Dakota Quarterly, Salamander, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Borderlands, and other journals. Currently a writer in resident at Proximity/Writer’s House in Pittsburgh, she is also an Assistant Professor of First Year Writing at Michigan State University and serves as an associate poetry editor for Nimrod.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Fall 2021 Virtual Creative Writing Programming

I wish to sign up for "Going In, Reaching Out: The Eternal Search of Ecstatic Poets." 

Beneath all that we celebrate and lament as human experience is a longing that threads through everything. It’s with us when we feel most transcendent and when we are most brokenly holy. No matter how connected we become through various social and technological means, there remains something unknowable, ineffable, just beyond reach. It may be called God, the divine, the soul, Ātman, serenity, consciousness, and numerous other names. Poet and scholar Brandon Thompson calls it essence. He and others have defined ecstatic poetry as a practice that poets and readers use to channel our longing for that essence. Poet Sheila Packa tells us that an ecstatic poem “is a ladder that the reader climbs.”

This seminar-style workshop will examine several examples from millennia of human strivings for the divine and the intensely human, ranging from such classic poets like Rumi to song lyrics by Leonard Cohen and Lhasa de Sela. We’ll then take a journey inward together and make our own attempts at writing ecstatic poems.

Scott Chalupa is the author of Quarantine(PANK Books 2019), a collection exploring how people loved one another through the early AIDS pandemic. He lives and writes in South Carolina, where he earned an M.F.A. in poetry at the University of South Carolina, and currently teaches at Central Carolina Technical College. His work is primarily concerned with queering stories and experiences not usually seen as queer, as well as reinterpreting cosmology and astrophysics to probe human connections to the mortal and the eternal. His work has appeared in Transition: Poems in the AfterglowPANKpacificREVIEWNimrodBeloit Poetry Journal, and other publications.

For more information about our additional fall 2021 creative writing programming, please visit our website: https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/conference-for-readers-writers/.

Order a one- or two-year digital subscription to Nimrod International Journal.

Digital subscriptions will be sent by email as PDFs.

Order a one- or two-year domestic print subscription to Nimrod International Journal.

If you live outside the U.S. and would like to subscribe to Nimrod, please email nimrod@utulsa.edu with your mailing address. We will then send you specific information about the shipping cost for your subscription and a link to subscribe. 

Order a digital sample issue to acquaint yourself with the journal or a specific back issue of interest to you. All digital issues are in PDF format. 

Currently available digital issues:

Endings and Beginnings, Vol 64, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2021

Awards 42, Vol. 64, No. 1, Fall/Winter 2020

Words on Play, Vol. 63, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2020

Awards 41, Vol. 63, No. 1, Fall/Winter 2019

Voices of the Middle East and North Africa, Vol. 62, No. 2, Spring/Summer 2019

Order a sample print issue to acquaint yourself with the journal or a specific back issue of interest to you.

Our Back Issue Grab Bag contains two random back issues of Nimrod for just $2.00 each plus shipping. It's a great way to familiarize yourself with the magazine and see a range of what we've published!

Please note that our most recent issue is not included in the Back Issue Grab Bag. To receive our most recent issue, you must order a single digital or print issue using the appropriate order form.

WHAT NOW: THE FUTURE WE MAKE

For our Spring/Summer 2022 issue, What Now?: The Future We Make, Nimrod International Journal invites poems, short stories, creative nonfiction pieces, and translations on the subject of the future we make.

We’ve heard it so often over the last year: We live in unprecedented times. As we write this call for submissions, the world is grappling with the worst pandemic in modern history, urgent calls for racial justice, and challenges to all aspects of the ways we've lived. In this time of deep change, the question that arises over and over again is: “What now?”

What is also unprecedented is that we have a rare opportunity to pause and question the often unexamined assumptions about the world as it is and as it could be. What do we keep from the past that worked? What do we jettison? What do we enlarge and embrace? The drastic changes to our individual and collective lives call on us to reimagine the future we want. That future is in our hands—our future is the future we make.

We won’t find all the answers here—in fact, we will probably find more questions than answers—but as marine biologist and conservation strategist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson writes, “The more we can envision a world we want to live in, the more we will be inspired to move toward it.” In this issue, we wish to move toward that world and explore its possibilities together.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that examines both micro and macro versions of the future: our futures on individual, relationship, or family levels as well as our social, national, and worldwide future. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

  • Work about changing expectations, from our relationships to our home lives to our occupations to our larger communities
  • Work that deals with personal and community trauma—not only how we survive it, but how we surface after disaster, how we find the will and courage to continue
  • Work about the environment, climate change, and sustainability
  • Work in speculative genres (such as Afrofuturism) actively engaging with future possibilities, both bleak and hopeful
  • Work that creates new myths, that reimagines old stories in ways that lead to new and different outcomes
  • Work that explores the range and variety of the “we” in the “the future we make”
  • Work that projects inclusion, equity, openness, and joy
  • Work that explores, meditates on, or engages with any aspect of making the future we want, in unexpected and unique ways.

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope you'll surprise us with additional ideas we haven't thought of about making the future we want.

We're excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for the issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

  • Creative nonfiction may be up to 7,500 words.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, authors are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.
  • Submissions may also be made by mail to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK, 74104. Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2022 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.
  • If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Manuscripts will be accepted beginning June 1, 2021.

Postmark deadline: November 1, 2021

Publication date: Spring 2022

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Questions: 

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

WHAT NOW: THE FUTURE WE MAKE

For our Spring/Summer 2022 issue, What Now?: The Future We Make, Nimrod International Journal invites poems, short stories, creative nonfiction pieces, and translations on the subject of the future we make.

We’ve heard it so often over the last year: We live in unprecedented times. As we write this call for submissions, the world is grappling with the worst pandemic in modern history, urgent calls for racial justice, and challenges to all aspects of the ways we've lived. In this time of deep change, the question that arises over and over again is: “What now?”

What is also unprecedented is that we have a rare opportunity to pause and question the often unexamined assumptions about the world as it is and as it could be. What do we keep from the past that worked? What do we jettison? What do we enlarge and embrace? The drastic changes to our individual and collective lives call on us to reimagine the future we want. That future is in our hands—our future is the future we make.

We won’t find all the answers here—in fact, we will probably find more questions than answers—but as marine biologist and conservation strategist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson writes, “The more we can envision a world we want to live in, the more we will be inspired to move toward it.” In this issue, we wish to move toward that world and explore its possibilities together.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that examines both micro and macro versions of the future: our futures on individual, relationship, or family levels as well as our social, national, and worldwide future. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

  • Work about changing expectations, from our relationships to our home lives to our occupations to our larger communities
  • Work that deals with personal and community trauma—not only how we survive it, but how we surface after disaster, how we find the will and courage to continue
  • Work about the environment, climate change, and sustainability
  • Work in speculative genres (such as Afrofuturism) actively engaging with future possibilities, both bleak and hopeful
  • Work that creates new myths, that reimagines old stories in ways that lead to new and different outcomes
  • Work that explores the range and variety of the “we” in the “the future we make”
  • Work that projects inclusion, equity, openness, and joy
  • Work that explores, meditates on, or engages with any aspect of making the future we want, in unexpected and unique ways.

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope you'll surprise us with additional ideas we haven't thought of about making the future we want.

We're excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for the issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

  • Fiction may be up to 7,500 words.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, authors are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.
  • Submissions may also be made by mail to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK, 74104. Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2022 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.
  • If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Manuscripts will be accepted beginning June 1, 2021.

Postmark deadline: November 1, 2021

Publication date: Spring 2022

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Questions: 

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

WHAT NOW: THE FUTURE WE MAKE

For our Spring/Summer 2022 issue, What Now?: The Future We Make, Nimrod International Journal invites poems, short stories, creative nonfiction pieces, and translations on the subject of the future we make.

We’ve heard it so often over the last year: We live in unprecedented times. As we write this call for submissions, the world is grappling with the worst pandemic in modern history, urgent calls for racial justice, and challenges to all aspects of the ways we've lived. In this time of deep change, the question that arises over and over again is: “What now?”

What is also unprecedented is that we have a rare opportunity to pause and question the often unexamined assumptions about the world as it is and as it could be. What do we keep from the past that worked? What do we jettison? What do we enlarge and embrace? The drastic changes to our individual and collective lives call on us to reimagine the future we want. That future is in our hands—our future is the future we make.

We won’t find all the answers here—in fact, we will probably find more questions than answers—but as marine biologist and conservation strategist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson writes, “The more we can envision a world we want to live in, the more we will be inspired to move toward it.” In this issue, we wish to move toward that world and explore its possibilities together.

What We Are Seeking:

We’re looking for work that examines both micro and macro versions of the future: our futures on individual, relationship, or family levels as well as our social, national, and worldwide future. Here are a few examples of what submissions for this issue might look like:

  • Work about changing expectations, from our relationships to our home lives to our occupations to our larger communities
  • Work that deals with personal and community trauma—not only how we survive it, but how we surface after disaster, how we find the will and courage to continue
  • Work about the environment, climate change, and sustainability
  • Work in speculative genres (such as Afrofuturism) actively engaging with future possibilities, both bleak and hopeful
  • Work that creates new myths, that reimagines old stories in ways that lead to new and different outcomes
  • Work that explores the range and variety of the “we” in the “the future we make”
  • Work that projects inclusion, equity, openness, and joy
  • Work that explores, meditates on, or engages with any aspect of making the future we want, in unexpected and unique ways.

This list is just to get your ideas flowing; we hope you'll surprise us with additional ideas we haven't thought of about making the future we want.

We're excited about this issue, so please send your work and share this announcement with writing groups, students, and friends. We hope to receive a variety of material for the issue, with interpretations of this theme from writers of all backgrounds and publication histories; we especially welcome work from writers who are Black, Indigenous, and people of color, writers of all sexual orientations and gender identities, writers of varying socio-economic status, and writers with physical or mental differences.

The Specifics:

  • Poetry may be up to 7 pages. No more than one poem per page.
  • All work must be previously unpublished.
  • Work not originally in English must be translated into English. For work in translation, authors are responsible for obtaining permission to reprint any material under copyright that exceeds the guidelines of fair use or does not have a Creative Commons license.
  • Submissions may also be made by mail to Nimrod, The University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Dr., Tulsa, OK, 74104. Please mark both your cover letter and the outer envelope with “Spring 2022 Theme.” Send a SASE for response. Postal submissions are free.
  • If the online submission fee or the postage to send work by mail will pose a substantial economic burden, writers may seek a waiver of the fee. To seek a waiver, please email us at nimrod@utulsa.edu with your request and reasons for seeking a waiver.

Manuscripts will be accepted beginning June 1, 2021.

Postmark deadline: November 1, 2021

Publication date: Spring 2022

Payment: $10/printed page with a $200 maximum.

Nimrod is a nonprofit literary magazine published by The University of Tulsa, with issues appearing twice a year. All contributors to the magazine also receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Questions: 

Email nimrod@utulsa.edu or visit https://artsandsciences.utulsa.edu/nimrod/.

  • Up to 7 pages of poetry
  • All poems should be included in a single file, no more than one poem per page
  • Previously unpublished poems only
  • For general submissions, please include your name in the body of your manuscript
  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Stories should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
  • For general submissions, please include your name in the body of your manuscript
  • 7,500 words maximum
  • Stories should be double-spaced
  • Previously unpublished stories only
  • For general submissions, please include your name in the body of the manuscript
Nimrod International Journal